Garnet with Muscovite mica.

Garnet with Muscovite mica.

The two main components of this specimen are almandine garnet, and muscovite mica. There is also some quartz, and dull grey/black amphiboles. The wine red garnet is massive, and only shows fractured surfaces. The muscovite mica is shiny silverish plates, with some pseudo hexagonal plates observed. This specimen should really be listed as a rock rather than a mineral. It's location is from the pegmatites of the Evje area of Norway.

Tourmaline

Tourmaline

Tourmaline is a crystalline boron silicate mineral. The specimen is composed of  black tourmaline in massive granular form, set in granite.The structure of the crystals is not immediately obvious because of the massive nature. The inset central photograph is approx 5 mm  x 5 mm and is taken from the surface of the smaller specimen. The parallel acicular crystals can be seen, but even the longest crystals are only 2 mm in length. The specimens location is only known as Cornwall.

Calcite.

Calcite.

Calcite,  CaCO3   calcium carbonate. There is nothing remarkable about this specimen. It is simply a lump of massive calcite, included in this collection only because I took a fancy to it when I visited the Snailbeach mine in Shropshire, about 15 years ago. There is an enormous amount of this gangue mineral at the mine, which was the largest lead mine in Shropshire. The calcite on the waste tips is very often found in association with sphalerite. or with sphalerite inclusions. Tested with a U.V. light it fluoresces a pale red.  

Calcite.

Calcite.

Calcite, CaCO3  Calcium carbonate. This specimen is from Whately quarry near Wells in Somerset. The quarry is a limestone quarry, and not surprisingly the most collected mineral from this quarry is calcite. The scalenahedral crystals have developed in a void, and are cream coloured. The orange effect is because the basic crystals have been coated with minute orange coloured crystals. The crystals are based on a bed of massive calcite, which is atop a base rock of hematite.  

Limestone

Limestone

Limestone, Carbonate rock, Cotham marble var. This is a specimen that should not be in my mineral collection. It could be included in my rock collection, or my fossil collection. It is not a true marble, but a limestone, and is a localised variety restricted to South Wales and West of England  The patterns in this semi polished specimen from Cotham, near Bristol have been created by the upward growth of algae and worms, and are about 200 million years in age.